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Consumer Energy Prices in Europe: Electricity Prices for Households

Welcome to our tracker on consumer energy prices in Europe, sourced from the latest Eurostat data covering the first half of 2023. On this page, we focus on Electricity Prices for Households, providing key insights and trends. For comprehensive analysis on other categories, please visit our dedicated pages:

Explore these links for in-depth information on each sector.

Electricity Prices for Households

Electricity prices for household consumers in the EU stood at €0.289 per kWh (all taxes and levies included) in the first half of 2023, according to the latest Eurostat data. This is only slightly higher than in the second half of 2022, indicating that electricity price levels have stabilised in 2023, though current prices are still at record high levels.

Household consumers in the Netherlands, Belgium, Romania and Germany faced the highest electricity prices in the first half of 2023. In the Netherlands, a medium-sized household with an annual consumption between 2,500 kWh and 5,000 kWh saw an average price of €0.48 per kWh.

A more detailed breakdown of electricity prices for different household consumption groups shows that Italy has the highest prices for the smallest consumer groups (less than 1000 kWh, while the Netherlands have the highest prices for the two largest consumer groups (5000 kWh to 14999 and above 15000 kWh in annual consumption).

Electricity prices for household consumers increased in almost all European countries in the first half of 2023 compared to the same period in 2022. The largest increases (including taxes) occurred in the the Netherlands, Liechtenstein and Lithuania.

The chart below provides a more detailed view of electricity prices over time at country-level from 2007 to 2023. Note that not all countries have data for the full period covered by Eurostat data:

There is significant variation in the impact of taxes and levies on electricity prices for consumers. The highest share of taxes and levies on the final retail price was observed in Poland, Cyprus and Sweden in the first half of 2023.

Price levels differ greatly between European countries. The following visualization display electricity prices measured in Eurostat’s purchasing power standard (PPS). The PPS is calculated so that one unit of PPS buys the same amount of goods and services in each country, adjusting for differences in price levels. When electricity prices are measured in PPS, the highest prices for household consumers in the first half of 2023 were observed in Romania, Cyprus and the Netherlands.

About the data

The data presented on this page is based on Eurostat’s electricity price statistics (households and non-households), and Eurostat’s natural gas price statistics(households and non-households). Data is published twice annually by Eurostat.

Note that the article shows data for all countries Eurostat publishes data for, including non-EU member countries, to give the broadest possible picture of price developments in European countries.

Changelog

  • First release December 2022, with Eurostat data covering the first half of 2022.
  • Updated in April 2023 with data from Eurostat covering the second half of 2022.
  • Updated in September 2023 with data for non-household consumers.
  • Updated in October 2023 with Eurostat data covering the first half of 2023.

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